Wednesday, March 4, 2009

khawuleza

But if you are going to wear blinders then you do not know the world.
Miriam Makeba (b. 4 March 1932- 2008) singer & civil rights activist

yesterday, being tuesday, ms t and I found ourselves at the library. our normal library program was on break as it transitions from the 'winter' session to the 'spring' session; instead we cruised the shelves, picked out some books and spent some time playing in the librainium (the library's organic learning center). I had something to look up in the library's catalog, while I was looking up my books, ms t jumped on the neighboring computer to 'work on her blog,' at least that is what she told mr. andy and the other librarian who asked her what she was up to. needless to say, I thought we were all going to bust a gut laughing! it was a real art linkletter/bill cosby moment - kids do say the darnest things!

miriam makeba singing khawuleza in 1966. miriam makeba, referred to by many as mama afrika, is credited as the person who brought 'world music' to the west. she left south africa in the 1950s and began an international singing career. during the 1960s she toured with harry belafonte. in 1963 she returned to south africa to attend the funeral of her mother only to learn that her south african passpost had been revoked because of her testimony against apartheid before the united nations. she was granted honorary citizenship in ten countries and held nine passports. in 1990, nelson mandela persuaded her to return to south africa. in the late 1980s she wrote her autobiography makeba: my story which is on my list of books I'd like to read. she was both a tireless performer and a tireless activist. she died last november at 76. we all miss you mama.....


16 comments:

Reya Mellicker said...

Isn't it incredible to think of how much S. Africa has changed since then? They're more progressive than we are in many ways.

Never say never! Great vid - her sax player looks a bit like our president.

R.L. Bourges said...

oh that's a great performance by Makeba (and a great bio too) - thanks for both.

Ms T 'working on her blog' - now...WHERE could she have picked that up, I wonder? :-)

(love the way the flowers on her jeans match up to her top - very, very nice. My best to the demoiselle, comme d'habitude, from her friend in Graulhet.)

best

flawsnall said...

excellent place for her to be. she's in the best hands.

John Hayes said...

What a voice! The arrangement behind Miriam Makeba for this song is also excellent. Wonderful video.

musicjunkie said...

i absolutely ADORE Miriam Makeba. I came to know of her through Henry Rollins, a punk musician, poet, actor, and activist. It's always a great loss when someone like her passes away. She actually passed away while on stage singing Pata, Pata. I just think it's great when someone 'goes' doing something they love.

willow said...

She was great, wasn't she?

Megan said...

I sang 'The Click Song' on my way in to work this morning. Of course, I can't make the click sound. But I tried.

My mother used to play her albums for us all the time when we were kids...

e said...

Ditto for my mother...I loved Mekeba's spirit, a real loss to the planet.

As for the adorable Ms. T, she will have many fun times and fine memories of the library and you to grow on. Way to go, kid and Kim!

Roy said...

Ayuh, we can tell who Ms T's been hanging out with. "Working on my blog" indeed! Heh, heh!

Thanks for the Miriam Makeba video. She is definitely missed, but at least she left us an extensive legacy.

Loveanewidea said...

Ms T's comment is toooo cuuuuute!

mouse (aka kimy) said...

xxxxx

Sandra Leigh said...

I remember the first time I heard Miriam Makeba sing, back in the sixties. Her voice was thrilling. I miss her.

edward said...

Ms. T could have a blog...

Marmsk said...

Years ago when Miriam was in NYC, I was going to go to her show, but she was unwell, so the show was cancelled. I was heartbroken. I had hoped to get her to autograph my LP album. She was so talented, a great ambassador.

Edward Yablonsky said...

Makeba's first encounter with the severity of government rule in her native land came when she was just two-and-one-half weeks old: following her mother's arrest for the illegal sale of home-brewed beer, young Makeba served a six-month jail term with her. Makeba's formative years were equally difficult. As a teenager she performed backbreaking domestic work for white families and endured physical abuse from her first husband. She found solace and a sense of community, though, in music and religion. Singing first in a choir, Makeba soon showcased her talents with local bands, achieving success on the regional club circuit.

Makeba first captured international attention with her role in the pseudodocumentary Come Back, Africa, a controversial anti-apartheid film released in 1959. Following the film's showing at the Venice Film Festival, Makeba traveled to London, where she met respected American entertainer and activist Harry Belafonte. Impressed with her unique and profound renderings of native folksongs, he served as her mentor and promoter in the United States, arranging gigs for her in New York City clubs and a guest spot on The Steve Allen Show. The exposure brought her worldwide acclaim and launched a cross-cultural musical career of epic proportions.

I found the bio on her life inspiring and her sojourn with Paul Simon as an advancement in spiritual evolving of our planet as a whole. Yet we have a much father journey to travel.

disa said...

I love it ! Very creative ! That's actually really cool Thanks.