Friday, October 24, 2008

waterfall

last friday I went to see the documentary flow. I have been meaning do a post on the film in order to give my enthusiastic thumbs up and urge everyone concerned about the health and survival of our species and our planet to try and find a way to see this very important film.

this probably is not a flim that will be coming to the local megaplex (unless you live in burlington, vermont). however, it is now playing in select theaters all over the u.s. I hope it will be released as a dvd so it get get wider distribution. the issue is global, and the film should be seen all over.

among the issues raised in the film are the problems connected with the growing privatization of the world's dwindling fresh water supply. water is our planet's most essential resource, but because of the dominance of for-profit interests water has gone from being a public good to become a major industry (in fact the third largest industry). the privatization of water has contributed to a multitude of social and environmental problems.

in 1948, the 30 articles of the universal declaration of human rights were ratified by all the nations of the world. these 30 articles guaranteed a broad sweep of human rights across many human endeavors. today human rights activists recognize that access to clean and potable water is fundamental and should be included in the universal declaration of human rights. currently over a billion people across the planet lack access to clean and potable water and that millions die each year as a result.

since today is united nations day, it seems only fitting to have 31 as our number of the day.

there is a movement underway to add a 31st article to the universal declaration of human rights.
Article 31:
Everyone has the right to clean and accessible water, adequate for the health and well-being of the individual and family, and no one shall be deprived of such access or quality of water due to individual economic circumstance.
if you feel that water is fundamental and access to clean potable water is a vital human right, sign the petition to call upon the united nations to add it to the declaration.

waterfall by cris williamson waterfall is on williamson's album the "changer and the changed" released in 1975 by olivia records.

photo: water pump outside family homestead lofty, pennsylvania may, 2008.

12 comments:

tut-tut said...

Chis Williamson! How fitting in with your recent post featuring Holly Near. I remember that record (remember them?) well.

Flow; I hadn't heard of this movie. Thanks for posting about all of this. Your links are always appreciated.

jenclair said...

I have not heard of Flow, either, but I have been concerned about the water situation. The West has had problems for years and even have water police (or sheriffs or something).

Drilling for oil requires a lot of water and areas of heavy drilling deplete the ground water...which has been a problem in many areas.

Merle Sneed said...

Out here in the desert I worry about water alot. The big cities like Phoenix and Las Vegas are very wasteful.

Megan said...

There has been a lot of over-building in places like Vegas and Phoenix, and the California Central Valley. I think the role of the builders as a contributing factor in the housing crisis has been largely overlooked...

Sorry, Merle threw me off topic!

bitchlet said...

There is so much chlorine in our water that I fear I'll lose all my hair someday really soon.

lettuce said...

this is one of the most shocking indicators of inequality and injustice - and inhumaneness - in the world

i wonder if the petition will have any success?

Saretta said...

This is truly an important issue! Here in Puglia, we are suffering from water shortage and undergoing a process they call "desertification." Becoming a desert...no fun for anyone!

Please stop by Molfetta Daily Photo for an award...

Absolute Vanilla (and Atyllah) said...

This is such a critical post. I was told a couple of months ago by a friend in the investment world that I should invest in a particular fund, because they were "doing smart things like investing in water - it's the hot new commodity". What have we come to when basic human rights become "commodities" on which people can make money?!
I've signed the petition and sent it on to friends.

R.L. Bourges said...

can't think of a single meaningful thing to say, petite souris. But will think of something, eventually, meaningful or not :-)

thanks for the info.

Gary said...

Water seems to be 'in the air' lately...

When Junk Thief came to visit my class last month he shared information with the kids about precious water and how difficult it is for many people to gain access to clean water. The students were puzzled and amazed since all we have to do is turn on the faucet.

This past Thursday we went to see the show 'The City that Drinks the Mountain Sky' at the Tribecca Performing Arts Center. It told the story of how NYC gets its water by using puppets and music. Very clever. I am hoping that all of this will bring my students to an appreciation and understanding of this topic. And in the meanwhile, I am learning much myself.

Barbara said...

I think water will rank right up there with the big problems of the world in this century. Our own Southwest is living on borrowed time (water-wise) in my opinion.

Reya Mellicker said...

It's interesting that my father, way back in the early 1970's told us that fresh water would be the biggest issue in the early 21st century.

How did he know?

Can't bear to go see this film, at least not until after the election. My nerves are frayed as it is. Seeing this film could put me right over the edge.